[BLML] All gone quiet

agot agot at ulb.ac.be
Mon Dec 1 14:08:51 CET 2014


Le 01.12.2014 04:32, Richard Hills a écrit :
>  
> 
> Sven Pran:
> 
>  
> 
> I see no reason to change the laws on this matter.
> 
> It is clear to me that the Director has the power to “rule
> otherwise” if he finds cause, but such cause must be real.
> 
> As such cause most necessarily must bed of an extraordinary nature the
> laws do not specify possible criteria but leave it for the Director to
> judge. He certainly may not use his powers arbitrarily.
> 
>  
> 
> Richard Hills:
> 
>  
> 
> A real-life paradigm case occurred (to the best of my recollection) in
> the 2001 Kansas City Nationals. A sweet old lady as defender exposed
> 13 cards. Declarer summoned the Director. A generous declarer would
> have requested the Director to waive the 13 penalty cards. But this
> declarer valued his competive score more than niceness to sweet old
> ladies. (And, indeed, niceness has to stop somewhere. If a sweet old
> lady bids 7H with the ace of trumps offside, I do not accept her Law
> 25B attempt to convert the contract to 6H.) So the declarer refused to
> request a waiver of the 13 penalty cards.
> 
>  
> 
> The Director over-rode declarer's wishes, not only ruling that the 13
> exposed cards were not penalty cards, but also ruling that the 13
> exposed cards were not unauthorised information.
> 
>  
> 
> The Director's so-called "cause of an extraordinary nature" was that
> the sweet old lady had accidentally knocked over her card-holder. This
> does not seem "extraordinary" to me, given that there are several Laws
> defining correct procedure for a Director after an accidental
> placement of a card on the table.

Alas, they don't settle the case of accidental placement of many cards 
on the table.

There must be some situations when such event will not lead to penalty 
cards - say that one *opponent* has knocked over the card-holder.
But it is equally unfair to allow the LOL's pa&rtner to benefit from the 
sight of the cards, meaning their opponents might suffer a bad result 
for no reason.

Is it impossible, in such an extreme case, to declare the board 
unplayable ? Which will probably be the case if the person in charge of 
transmitting the board at the table had inadvertently spilt some cards, 
so this is not absent from the laws. "Saving the board" is a noble 
objective ; but FUBARs happen.


Best regards

   Alain



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